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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the Wind and current charts found in the catalog.

Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the Wind and current charts

Matthew Fontaine Maury

Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the Wind and current charts

approved by Commodore Charles Morris, Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, and published by authority of Hon. J.C. Dobbin, Secretary of the Navy

by Matthew Fontaine Maury

  • 368 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by E.C. and J. Biddle in Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Winds.,
  • Ocean currents.,
  • Pilot guides.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby M.F. Maury.
    ContributionsUnited States Naval Observatory.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsVK802 .M4 1855
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxxvi, 869, [1], 34 p., 23 leaves of plates :
    Number of Pages869
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6559138M
    LC Control Number13016504
    OCLC/WorldCa11625885

    Sailing Directions are complementary to Admiralty Standard Nautical Charts and provide worldwide coverage in 74 volumes. Each publication contains quality colour photography and views, as well as information on navigational hazards, buoyage, meteorological data, details of pilotage, regulations, port facilities and guides to major port : $ Marine Chandlery: a well equipped sail loft and specialist rigging division. Volvo, Yanmar, Nanni, Mercruiser inboards, and Mercury and Yamaha outboard engines, spares and repairs are catered for in our dedicated engineering workshop.

    The amount of sail cloth used would vary depending of the strength of the wind. Three sheets to the wind is believed by some to mean three windmill sails to the wind, which was not a good thing. If the windmill rotated with just three sails to the wind, it would be uneven and potentially damage machinery and even the structure of the mill itself. In fact, it’s 20 knots (true wind speed) - 10 knots (cycle speed in same direction as wind direction) = 10 knots apparent wind speed (AWS). Of course, we can’t sail directly into wind, with most sailing boats only ever managing to sail at say 30 degrees off the true wind.

    A point of sail is a sailing craft's direction of travel under sail in relation to the true wind direction over the surface.. The principal points of sail roughly correspond to 45° segments of a circle, starting with 0° directly into the wind. For many sailing craft 45° on either side of the wind is a no-go zone, where a sail is unable to mobilize power from the wind.   Teaches traditional forecasting based on current observed conditions, as well as the latest tools including facsimile charts and the Internet. An easy-to-use tool for sailors, power boaters, professional seamen, and anyone interested in the weather.


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Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the Wind and current charts by Matthew Fontaine Maury Download PDF EPUB FB2

Excerpt from Explanations and Sailing Directions to Accompany the Wind and Current Charts: Approved by Commodore Charles Morris, Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography After these have been discussed, until the phenomena they conceal have been sufficiently developed, or developed as far as the materials on hand were capable of Author: M.

Maury. Explanations and Sailing Directions to accompany the Wind and Current Charts, approved by C. Morris and published by authority of Hon.

Dobbin [M. Maury] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the : M.

Maury. Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the Wind and current charts, approved by Commodore Lewis Warrington, chief of the Bureau of ordnance and hydrography; and pub. by authority of Hon. William A. Graham, secretary of the navy. Contributor Names. Explanations and Sailing Directions to Accompany the Wind and Current Charts Matthew Fontaine Maury Full view -   Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the Wind and current charts, approved by Commodore Charles Morris, chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography; by Maury, Matthew Fontaine, ; United States Naval ObservatoryPages: Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the Wind and current charts, approved by Captain D.N.

Ingraham, chief of the Bureau of ordnance and hydrography, and pub. by authority of Hon. Isaac Toucey, secretary of the Navy by Maury, Matthew Fontaine, Pages: You need to enable JavaScript to run this app.

(Corrected to Week 21/20) CURRENT EDITIONS OF SAILING DIRECTIONS NP Title Edition Week 1 Africa Pilot Vol 1 18th () 47/17 2 Africa Pilot Vol 2 18th () 39/17 3 Africa Pilot Vol 3 18th () 16/19 4 South-East Alaska Pilot 8th () 16/15 5 thSouth America Pilot Vol 1 19 () 22/17File Size: KB. to be read in conjunction with the charts.

Sailing Directions consist of a series of books. Each book covers a specific geographic area and cross references all charts in that area.1 The traditional process to study a track consists of displaying the nautical chart along with the Sailing Directions book.

By identifying all the features of. Plate XV, shown above, from Maury’s “Explanations and Sailing Directions” is a chart of the winds based on information derived from the Pilot Charts.

The object of this chart is to make the young seamen acquainted only with the prevailing direction of the wind in every part of the ocean. “Sir: I transmit herewith a copy of a letter addressed by me to the Hon. Secretary of the Navy, on the subject of discontinuing the publication, in the present form, of the ‘Wind and Current Charts,’ and ‘Sailing Directions,’ accompanying them; and now, with the approval of the department, I have the honor to refer the same subject to the National Academy of Sciences, for investigation and report.

The main points we want to understand is that when sailing any course other than directly downwind (or, obviously, in the no-sail zone) the apparent wind will always come from farther ahead than the true wind, and that when sailing any course from beam reach to close hauled the apparent wind will be stronger (higher velocity) than the true wind.

Seamanship, Navigation\Explanations and sailing directions to accompany wind and current charts,M.F. Seamanship, Navigation\Fair Winds and Foul, a narrative of Daily Life Aboard an American Clipper Ship,Frederick Seamanship, Navigation\Fore & Aft Seamanship for Yachtsmen,published by Charles Weather routeing.

Weather conditions can also affect a ship's navigation, and in IMO adopted resolution A(13), Recommendation on Weather Routeing, which recognizes that weather routeing - by which ships are provided with "optimum routes" to avoid bad weather - can aid safety. The wind fills the sail into the shape of a wing, but because the sail is held fast at both ends, the wind can't push it out of the way.

Instead the wind must change direction to flow parallel to the sail. The taut sail has created a force on the wind that causes it to change direction and Newton's third law tells us that there is an equal and.

Oceans, Currents, the shape of the world and the age of discovery. Felipe Fernández-Armesto • Pathfinders: A Global History of Exploration Central Thesis • Wind patterns dictated sailing • Early exploration used seasonal reversal • Made sailing directions and took angles of pole star.

Nautical & Sailing Terms & Nomenclature Apparent Wind - the direction and velocity of the wind relative to the speed and direction of the boat which is derived from the True Wind and Wind of Motion.

This is the wind you feel on your face when on a moving sailboat. Countercurrent - a secondary current flowing adjacent to and in the. Points of Sail & Sailing Directions. Next lesson -> Man Overboard Procedure Index: Learn to sail.

Points of Sail. The degrees quoted for points of sail are based on where the boat is going in relation to where the wind is coming from. So for example if the boat is heading directly into the wind that is 0 degrees and directly away from the wind.

Sailing Close to the Wind book. Read 29 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Dennis Skinner, the famed Beast of Bolsover, is adored by /5. If there is no current, a boat will point into the wind.

If the current is stronger than the wind, however, they may point in the direction of the current. If the wind and current are exerting about the same force on a boat, it will point midway between the current and wind directions.

Wind lines formed by puffs of stronger wind will make the. Edition 46 for A code for a free app is included in this book. The app links to charts, aerial photos, embedded videos, every marina, email support group, all port authorities, the wind charts, every anchorage, worldwide harbors, the tides, engine troubleshooting, all the weather, local knowledge, every dive site, every seabird, every.American Sailing Directions.

There is a volume American navigation publication published by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Sailing Directions consists of 37 Enroute volumes, 4 Planning Guide volumes, and 1 volume combining both types. Planning Guides describe general features of ocean basins and country-specific information such as firing areas, pilotage requirements.Navigation exam questions Q 1: list the nautical publication required for passage planning.

Ans: 1) voyage charts 2) Sailing direction. 3) A T T. 4) A L R S. 5) A L L. 6) Routing charts. 7) Ocean Current atlas. 8) Tidal stream Atlas. 9) Accumulative list of correction. 10) Annual summary of File Size: KB.